Test Images 2

Below is a combination of some test images I have been able to use to refine my approach and practice over the past couple of months. (These are not the same images that were physically submitted).

Please note, there are some photographs which are ‘perfect’ in their edit and how they were captured but they have not been included here as they give me nothing to talk about and improve for the next few months.

Points of improvement

  • Image 1 – will have to be replaced with a ‘straighter’ architectural photograph, the clouds in the background produce a nice moody effect and the contrast is quite nice. Possibly brighten up the area at the bottom a little bit.
  • Image 2 (top right hand side) – the lamp post and the building behind have been aligned, the bottom of the picture has too much cropped out of it. Try re-shooting with more ‘grounding’.
  • Image 3 (right, middle) – this image is quite powerful on its own, possibly re-shoot with bars in focus to imply the feeling of being locked out, or not supposed to be there.
  • Image 4 (right bottom) – brilliant use of natural light in this portrait, as well as showing the environment (kitchen), possibly get in closer to the subject.

Overall, these images go well together, and even without the above advised improvements, go well visually as a series. A building connected to a person/people is being suggested here through these photographs. To refine my work visually, I will be/have taken on board the above criticisms and will be posting ‘finished work’ from the middle of next month.

 

Artist Study – Laetitia Vancon

Laetitia Vancon was born in Toulouse, France, 1979. From an early age, due to her father’s service in the French Air Force, she led the restless childhood life of an “army brat”.
In 2003, after completing her studies as a Chemical Engineer she spent 6 years working within France and South Africa in a chemical firm manufacturing artificial flavor enhancers. The pressure, the feeling of insignificance convinced her to leave this life for something more unconventional. In 2009, she gave up her career, and while travelling throughout Australia and South East Asia, used photography to help her reconnect with herself and her environment.

In 2014, Vancon completed studies at the Danish Photojournalism School in Aarhus, specialising in Visual Storytelling. In November 2012, she received an award in Creative Journalism for her project “The Time goes by, Bruno stays” by Emaho Magazine.“The Top will Fall” was selected for the Sony World Photography Awards 2014, and she was short-listed for the RPS (Royal Photographic Society) International Print Exhibition. Her latest documentary “My Home, My Prison” was selected as favorite by l’ANI, at VISA POUR L’IMAGE September, 2014.

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NYT tearsheet, 2015, Vancon

Vancon has further developed and defined her distinctive, interactive approach to Documentary Photography. She places importance on connecting with her projects not to search for the latest scoop or hot news but to undertake them based on necessity. Adapting to more extensive, long term projects helps her create a more honest method of respectfully documenting peoples thoughts, emotions and place within society. By using this precise approach towards storytelling. Vancon hopes to confirm her values and belief in the importance of morality within today’s journalism.

She is relevant to contemporary documentary photojournalism and documentary debates. In addition, she moves fluidly between commercial, editorial and journalistic practice with a distinct style. She works well with natural light and has covered a range of issues I am interested in which is why I have chosen her for my study. She covers gentrification in Turkey in Life Carries On, as a personal project.

Below are my 3 key images for visual analysis.

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Fatos 9, Vancon, 2013

Image 1

  • The lighting in this image focuses on the child in the foreground as well as the 2 children in the background, these subjects work well together and do not detract from each other.
  • The main focal point is the child and her environment. The child, the graffiti’d wall behind her, the children behind her , help tell the story which is probably a justification for not blurring out the child’s background.
  • The light in this image appears to be artificial – there is a difference in the light distribution between the girl in the pink t shirt and her surroundings. This could however, be a result of the girl sitting where the sun was. The light enhances the message this photograph is sending.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to her creative approach to photojournalism/using photography as a tool for societal change.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by what is in the image (a child, surrounded by children and the architectural environment).
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting. Without the slanted angle of the pavement and the children in the background the message of this image would not be as strong.
  • In addition, the whole image in focus and the foreground and background being filled adds to the narrative. These composition choices appear to be intentional.
  • This image tells a story, the story is stronger as a series.
fatos10bis
Vancon, 2013

Image 2

  • The lighting in this image is quite dramatic. The lighting on the lower left hand sides adds more of a dynamic than an evenly lit photography would. The subject matter is clear – residential building demolition.
  • The main focal point is the shadow. The whole picture (the parts of the building still standing and the people in it), are part of this urban environment and this is justification for not blurring out the background.
  • The light in this image appears to be natural – there is a difference in the light distribution between the foreground and background but this is a result of the shadow the sunlight was casting. The light enhances the message this photograph is sending.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to her creative approach to photojournalism.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by what is in the image (changes to an architectural environment – a building being demolished).
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting. Without the shadow of the building in the foreground as opposed to background the message of this image would not be as strong.
  • In addition, the whole image in focus with the foreground and background being filled adds to the narrative. These composition choices appear to be intentional.
  • This image tells a story, the story is strong as a series and on its own.
fatos2
Vancon, 2013

Image 3

  • This is my favourite image. I took an image similar to this one before I had discovered Vancon.
  • The lighting in this image is quite beautiful. The lighting in the centre frames the child beautifully more so than an evenly lit photography would. The subject matter is clear -a child’s sense of wander as all she has ever known comes into question.
  • The main focal point is the girl. The whole picture (the details of the sofa) plus the little girl, form part of this her familial environment and this is justification for not blurring out the background.
  • The light in this image appears to be natural – coming straight from the window. The light enhances the message this photograph is sending.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to her creative approach to photojournalism.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by what is in the image (a child trying to process what sudden changes mean – where will she live, what is happening to her friends, can she look out of this window or sit in this sofa anymore?).
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting – an off centre rule of thirds approach has been taken. Without the light illuminating the girl, the message of this image would not be as strong.
  • In addition, the whole image in focus with the foreground and background being filled adds to the narrative. These composition choices appear to be intentional.
  • This image tells a story, the story is strong as a series and on its own.

Artist materials and processes

Vancon works both in black and white and in colour. Based on some of her work, I can assume that she uses a Canon DSLR or digital medium format for her work. Connection to her subjects is the priority which implies that she can live in places where she is working for extensive periods of time. Her photographs were taken in 2013 but the reportage was realised 2 years later. She is also aware of producing photographs for a variety of mediums. For example, newspapers (broadsheets), books and magazines.

Long term documentary photography projects where one is required to live in an environment other than their own, means a change in access to amenities such as electricity (important for photography battery charging). This implies, that it is more practical to complete such a project on film photography. Vancon has however, gone against this norm. She also combines interviews and collaborates with writers to add text to the online galleries where her personal projects are held. This adds context and an extra dynamic.

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Vancon, 2013

Key elements taken for my own practise

As a result of looking at Life Carries On, I will:

  • Become a bit more creative in the edit I produce of analogue styled black and white work which contains portraits with detail of the subject’s environment
  • Combine other elements into the final story besides photographs – such as statistics/text which can be used to represent the societal issue in question
  • Consider which other publications – besides a book, can used to present the story of the people represented and initiate a positive change

BIOGRAPHY (no date) Available at: http://www.vanconlaetitia.com/biography/ (Accessed: 11 December 2016).

PERSONAL PROJECTS (no date) Available at: http://www.vanconlaetitia.com/#/lifecarrieson/ (Accessed: 10 December 2016).

Artist Study – Giles Duley

Giles Duley was born in 1971 in London. After 10 years as an editorial photographer across fashion and music genres in both the US and Europe, Duley shifted his focus to humanitarian projects. Duley He has worked with well respected charities such as Sans Frontiers, IOM and UNHCR to highlight less widely known stories equally deserving of action and public attention. He has documented some horrific and challenging situations being sure to capture the strength of those who fight instead of succumbing to their problems. His photographs create empathy for lives varying in circumstances and allow the viewer to be drawn to the subject.

In 2011, whilst on patrol with 75th Cavalry Regiment, United States Army in Afghanistan, Duley stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED). He was severely injured, and became a triple amputee. He has since returned to work. His work has been exhibited and published worldwide in many respected publications including Vogue, GQ, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Sunday Times and others. In 2010 he was nominated for an Amnesty International Media Award and was a winner at the Prix de Paris in 2010 & 2012. His self-portrait was selected for the 2012 Taylor Wessing Exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery.

giles-duley-self-portrait-001
Self portrait – Taylor Wessing Photographic prize, 2012, Giles Duley

Duley’s work appeals to me because it is humanitarian and used to facilitate positive change for various members of society. His work deals with issues affecting a large proportion of society across continents . Duley has had to gain access to a range of communities and this takes both time and personal funding. He has successfully built up a network and is able to reconnect with people he meets in places as far as the Middle East! Whilst I am at a stage where I can still personally fund my long term documentary project, I do not have as much time. Duley’s longest and first project took 8 years.

The ability to use the camera as a tool for telling stories of marginalised communities is one that takes time and a lot of dedication and personal interest. For this assignment, I will be focusing on the series, A Family’s Story, Za’atari Refugee Camp. This series was done as a charity commission for Save The Children.

Below are my 3 key images for visual analysis.

a_family_s_story_28-1
Salwa waits for dinner, A Family’s Story, Jordan, Giles Duley

Image 1 – Salwa waits for dinner

  • The lighting in this image focuses on the child on the left hand side, and the slight vignette makes the detailed and ‘in-focus’ background, complimentary as opposed to distracting. especially behind the man in the centre.
  • The main focal point is the child and her environment. The child, the dinner and multiple cutlery pieces on the table help tell the story which is probably a justification for not blurring out the child’s background.
  • The light in this image is artificial – when you zoom in, the little girls eyes have evidence of on camera (or off) flash. Possibly a small flash gun, or continuous ring shaped LED lighting. The light enhances the message this photograph is sending.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to photojournalism/using photography as a tool for societal change.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by what is in the image (a child, surrounded by patterned furnishings – rug, the cultural food and even the other child’s feet in the top right hand corner).
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting. Without the slanted image, and the whole image in focus, the message of this image would not be as strong.
  • In addition, the patterns in this image add to the setting of this story being in that part of the world (Jordan) whilst the presence of a child draws empathy and makes the story relatable. These composition choices appear to be intentional.
  • This image tells a story, the story is just as strong as a series, as well as this image on its own.
a_family_s_story_16-1
Amin holds his youngest daughter Safa who was born in the camp 8 months ago. The family sees her as a blessing that has helped them get through the hardships of the camp, 2014, Jordan, Giles Duley

Image 2 – Amin holds his youngest daughter Safa…

  • The lighting in this image draws immediate attention to Safa, in her fathers arms.
  • The main focal point is the little girl, Safa.
  • The light appears to be artificial – from a flash gun, and emphasises the Safa more than Amin, her father.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to humanitarian and emotive photojournalism.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by the subjects of the image (father and daughter) as well as the feelings it evokes straight away – empathy, familiarity and a sense of compassion.
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting. The image has been cropped quite closely, to really remove any distracting background elements.This image is very strong on its own but also, with the series.
a_family_s_story_22-1
Amin washes his feet before prayer, Jordan, 2014, Giles Duley

Image 3 – Amin washes his feet before prayer

  • The lighting in this image creates a strong and moody photograph.
  • The main focal point is the right foot that the water is washing.
  • The light appears to be a combination of natural (daylight) and flash light, as there is a difference in light distribution between the arms – top part of the image, and the feet which are lower.
  • This is a typical image by the photographer and lends itself heavily to humanitarian work.
  • I think it is a successful image with the subject matter clearly indicated by what is in the image’s foreground (Amin washing his right foot) in contrast to the background (filled with stones/pebbles and the other parts of Amin’s body). It is strong for two reasons, it freezes the act and it shows a portrait without a face.
  • The composition of this image is quite interesting and this image tells a story, both on its own and as part of a series.
a_family_s_story_1-1
Amin’s family, Jordan, 2014, Giles Duley

Artist processes/materials used

Duley works both in black and white and in colour. Based on some of his behind the scenes/travel companion photos, I have seen that he uses a Canon DSLR for his work. In some of the earlier series however, it is possible that this work was completed on film. Cost throughout the process is important to Duley as he sells his prints at around £130. It is highly unlikely that film work can be sold so cheaply. His digital work is printed in a special way (inkjet photographic paper) and sold until the series is no longer available. He has also produced a number of books, images for campaigns and posters.

Long term documentary photography projects where one is required to live in an environment other than their own, means a change in access to amenities such as electricity (important for photography battery charging). This implies, that it is more practical to complete such a project on film photography. Duley has however, gone against this norm. He also combines statistics and facts with his humanitarian work to give it some context and an extra dynamic. For example:

“We have rights to dream and rights to achieve those dreams” – Amin

3 years of war.
6.5 million internally displaced people.
2.4 million Syrian refugees.
560,000 in Jordan alone.
Za’atari Camp with over 100,000 refugees.

Siwar, Amin and their five children.
One family.

Key elements taken for my own practise

As a result of looking at A Family’s Story, I will:

  • Produce an edit of analogue styled  black and white work which contains portraits with detail of the subject’s environment
  • Combine other elements into the final story besides photographs – such as statistics which can be used to represent the societal issue in question
  • Consider which other publications – besides a book, can used to present the story of the people represented and initiate a positive change

(no date) Available at: http://www.itsnicethat.com/watch/here-2012/giles-duley (Accessed: 11 December 2016).

(no date) Available at: http://www.slideshare.net/isabelleq/tedx-observer-unstoppable-ideas (Accessed: 11 December 2016).

Duley, G (no date) Available at: http://walkingwounded.emergencyuk.org/witness/giles-duley/ (Accessed: 11 December 2016).

Duley, G. (2013) Giles Duley: ’I lost three limbs in Afghanistan, but had to go back …  ‘. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/feb/10/giles-duley-photography-amputee-afghanistan (Accessed: 11 December 2016).

Duley, G. (2012) When a reporter becomes the story. Available at: https://www.ted.com/talks/giles_duley_when_a_reporter_becomes_the_story (Accessed: 11 December 2016).