Test Images 2

Below is a combination of some test images I have been able to use to refine my approach and practice over the past couple of months. (These are not the same images that were physically submitted).

Please note, there are some photographs which are ‘perfect’ in their edit and how they were captured but they have not been included here as they give me nothing to talk about and improve for the next few months.

Points of improvement

  • Image 1 – will have to be replaced with a ‘straighter’ architectural photograph, the clouds in the background produce a nice moody effect and the contrast is quite nice. Possibly brighten up the area at the bottom a little bit.
  • Image 2 (top right hand side) – the lamp post and the building behind have been aligned, the bottom of the picture has too much cropped out of it. Try re-shooting with more ‘grounding’.
  • Image 3 (right, middle) – this image is quite powerful on its own, possibly re-shoot with bars in focus to imply the feeling of being locked out, or not supposed to be there.
  • Image 4 (right bottom) – brilliant use of natural light in this portrait, as well as showing the environment (kitchen), possibly get in closer to the subject.

Overall, these images go well together, and even without the above advised improvements, go well visually as a series. A building connected to a person/people is being suggested here through these photographs. To refine my work visually, I will be/have taken on board the above criticisms and will be posting ‘finished work’ from the middle of next month.

 

Testing Images

(reposted from a different section of my blog from over a month ago)

This is probably one of the the hardest aspects for me. I am not sure if others can relate or if this is a personal thing. So, I went out with my camera and took some photographs on location. I did not ‘chimp‘ and changed lenses a couple times (f/1.8, 50mm and f/5.6-6.3 50-250mm). I left the images for 2 weeks (yes 2 weeks) before I even looked at them on my computer. In that time I did extra research on other artists, photographs and some paintings (see my blog for relevant Artist Studies to follow).

When I did upload the images to my computer, I followed the process of proofing in Bridge then exporting to Photoshop etc. I work in BOTH digital and analogue but I am on a limited budget this year. I’ve been working with analogue material for almost 5 years now and this gives me a pretty good idea of the image aesthetics I am after. I followed a series of editing processes in Photoshop to get my digital work to resemble my film work.

Test series image
A test series image, Gabrielle Guy, 2016

One of my most striking images was similar to the one above but I had to reject it from the series – yes reject, and here is the reason why. No matter how striking the image was on its own, it is ultimately part of a series. When I was viewing it, it was ticking the boxes – a finished look, good composition, good tonal range and good exposure but it didn’t have the same message as a slightly similar image to it, nor did it speak the same visual language when it was grouped with other images from the series (click here for the Project post on arranging images in space). Editing your work is a brutal process but for every image you ‘reject’ your work becomes more refined and your thought process clearer. Ultimately, so does the message you want your photographs to tell.

Final Year of Photography Degree!

So, the end of the final road begins. These past 2 years have been interesting as a Photography student. When you are completing placements, juggling freelancing and studying it can be hard to juggle all the information that is given to you and process it into something you can actually follow.

There are 3 things that I have learnt that have helped me a lot, they’ve been said over and over again but I don’t think the light fully switched on until final year so I will share them briefly below.

  1. Write down EVERY idea you have. As trivial as this sounds, there will be stages of growth in your development as a photographer. I now look back at ideas I had from the first year that I was not ready to shoot – I didn’t have the technical skills, the creative eye and quite frankly enough industry experience to attempt such a project. Writing it down tells your brain this is something important – not something I will be wasting time by doing and you’ll be surprised how much inspiration you can get after revisiting old ideas.
  2. READ like it’s going out of style! (I will elaborate this one further on in my blog) but when you are not making work, spend time looking at other creative work, journals, photographic magazines that explain how the successful live and think, books, films, paintings even music. You will find that when your reference these creatives in your work, your interpretation of it changes as you add your own flavour to what has been done before you. Saturate yourself in creativity, it helps you become more original.
  3. NEVER be afraid of failure. I cannot stress this last one enough. There will be some projects you try and you take some absolute sh*t pictures (at least I have) but this is all a part of the process. My editing in my early stages of learning  Photoshop was poor, and I had to submit some of this work for graded assignments. The feedback I got – though uncomfortable at the time, forced me to improve and to learn from what had gone wrong. It has been quite crazy how quickly the past 2 years have flown by, and I am glad that I attempted and failed the things I did at a time where it was less critical and I had a safe space to ‘fail in’. I can assure you that I’ve not made the same mistakes twice!

This year as I write my blog, I will be including more pictures, personal reflections and sharing tips for those creatives who wish to bridge the gap between student and professional and are unsure of how to go about it.

Welcome to my blog and please, don’t be afraid to leave a comment – I will reply.