Evaluation

My work in this project so far has been quite good. I started research early, from a variety of sources and had a general idea of what I wanted to document. This was further refined through group and individual tutorials as well as through research. I used a variety of sources – more than I have ever used for any one given project. This included a range of photojournalistic/narrative photography sources, where historical and contemporary practices are implemented. In addition, TEDx talks, videos/documentaries, Magnum Contact Sheets, traditional photography, books, Professional Photography magazines, the BJP, art based multi-media practitioners as well as material from exhibitions (for example Photo London) informed my research and practise.

I found it quite difficult to get a balance between commuting to attend so many lectures and finding time to take new material. It is common that final year students only attend taught sessions for 2 days a week in order to allow time for creative processes but our course is different from that approach. Whilst we are creative practitioners in training and still developing our own styles, it has been argued that trying to emulate other established photographers work can help discover techniques faster. Conversely, photographers such as Peter Marlow highlighted (in the November 2016 issue of Professional Photography) that his style began to develop when he stopped trying to copy Henri Cartier-Bresson and did his own thing. Balancing all of this industry advice as well as more traditional tutor advice was a little difficult. Lastly, in the same magazine, an art director anonymously cited the gender imbalance in industry photographers being on agents lists for representation and how the emerging photography style of today is too homogenised – “we need creative and fresh thinkers”.

Documentary projects of this nature, are at best, very time consuming and are rarely completed in a year. Some of the photographers I have analysed have spent up to 8/9 years on a personal documentary project whilst I barely have 9 months to realise and execute mine. One must also consider the ethics of the research I am doing and the type of photographs being taken, potential and past eviction experiences related to gentrification are not topics in a petri-dish, they are real, and those who experienced it will naturally have feelings about it.

Living in London (born & bred), in particular, the borough I am in, engenders interest and a reputability more than living where my University (Hertfordshire) would have. The project has developed quite nicely, considering all of the above factors, and I will capitalise on making further contact with the relevant potential subjects before everything slows down for the Christmas holidays. This will be with a range of people gentrification affects/involves and not just ‘victims’ will help to widen the story a bit more, an provide access to more people. Lastly to continue developing the story, shoots need to be occurring more regularly so that I can have more material to refine the ‘final story’ – especially continuing my spatial arrangements of printed photographs.

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Test Images 2

Below is a combination of some test images I have been able to use to refine my approach and practice over the past couple of months. (These are not the same images that were physically submitted).

Please note, there are some photographs which are ‘perfect’ in their edit and how they were captured but they have not been included here as they give me nothing to talk about and improve for the next few months.

Points of improvement

  • Image 1 – will have to be replaced with a ‘straighter’ architectural photograph, the clouds in the background produce a nice moody effect and the contrast is quite nice. Possibly brighten up the area at the bottom a little bit.
  • Image 2 (top right hand side) – the lamp post and the building behind have been aligned, the bottom of the picture has too much cropped out of it. Try re-shooting with more ‘grounding’.
  • Image 3 (right, middle) – this image is quite powerful on its own, possibly re-shoot with bars in focus to imply the feeling of being locked out, or not supposed to be there.
  • Image 4 (right bottom) – brilliant use of natural light in this portrait, as well as showing the environment (kitchen), possibly get in closer to the subject.

Overall, these images go well together, and even without the above advised improvements, go well visually as a series. A building connected to a person/people is being suggested here through these photographs. To refine my work visually, I will be/have taken on board the above criticisms and will be posting ‘finished work’ from the middle of next month.

 

Testing Images

(reposted from a different section of my blog from over a month ago)

This is probably one of the the hardest aspects for me. I am not sure if others can relate or if this is a personal thing. So, I went out with my camera and took some photographs on location. I did not ‘chimp‘ and changed lenses a couple times (f/1.8, 50mm and f/5.6-6.3 50-250mm). I left the images for 2 weeks (yes 2 weeks) before I even looked at them on my computer. In that time I did extra research on other artists, photographs and some paintings (see my blog for relevant Artist Studies to follow).

When I did upload the images to my computer, I followed the process of proofing in Bridge then exporting to Photoshop etc. I work in BOTH digital and analogue but I am on a limited budget this year. I’ve been working with analogue material for almost 5 years now and this gives me a pretty good idea of the image aesthetics I am after. I followed a series of editing processes in Photoshop to get my digital work to resemble my film work.

Test series image
A test series image, Gabrielle Guy, 2016

One of my most striking images was similar to the one above but I had to reject it from the series – yes reject, and here is the reason why. No matter how striking the image was on its own, it is ultimately part of a series. When I was viewing it, it was ticking the boxes – a finished look, good composition, good tonal range and good exposure but it didn’t have the same message as a slightly similar image to it, nor did it speak the same visual language when it was grouped with other images from the series (click here for the Project post on arranging images in space). Editing your work is a brutal process but for every image you ‘reject’ your work becomes more refined and your thought process clearer. Ultimately, so does the message you want your photographs to tell.